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Repairing the hut´s roof_Upper Guinea

Housing material 

Building materials as well as building design can have an impact on the accessibility of rodents to the houses. The number of burrows in the house and the hygiene of the immediate surrounding environment have been suggested as well as risk factors for rodent infestation and transmission of Lassa virus. The uses of the house might also have an impact on the presence and extended activity of M. Natalensis in West Africa as compare to studies in Tanzania. Some of the factors to have in mind are: the arrangement of furniture, the darkness of the houses, having doors and windows open, or doors and windows with gaps. Another consideration is the access to alternative building materials, such as cement, the cost of this material in relation to the household’s usual expenditure and the ease to which this can be accessed, both by the individuals and within different sized markets. Alongside this the local history of a region may contribute greatly to the presently used building materials, such as the increase in temporary accommodations in the aftermath of the civil war in Sierra Leone.

Resources

Housing factors and transmission of Lassa fever in a rural area of South-South Nigeria

The study compared the housing quality and hygiene in two peri-urban settlements in Irrua Town. The use of buildings for housing and commercial activities was found to be a risk for the transmission of Lassa fever in the houses.

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Housing equity for health equity: A rights-based approach to the control of Lassa fever in post-war Sierra Leone

This resource focuses on Lassa fever as a matter of human rights, proposing a strategy to improve housing quality, and discusses how housing equity has the potential to improve health equity and ultimately economic productivity in Sierra Leone. The paper is designed to spur discussion and action towards the provision of housing as part of efforts to prevent disease.

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Case-control study of Mastomys natalensis and humans in Lassa virus-infected households in Sierra Leone

This resource studied Lassa virus infection and antibodies in households where Lassa fever cases occurred and compared these to those in the nearest neighbour houses and "far" houses located across the village. It reports on rodent infection and human anti-body prevalence. 

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At home with Mastomys and Rattus: Human-rodent interactions and potential for primary transmission of Lassa virus in domestic spaces

In this study housing characteristics and domestic organization were fund to have an impact on the direct and indirect, intentional and unintentional contact with rodents indoors. More research on housing and environmental modification, as well as food storage are important for prevention against LASV transmission.

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Poor housing quality increases risk of rodent infestation and Lassa fever in refugee camps of Sierra Leone

To determine risk of Lassa fever in households in Sierra Leonean refugee camps, this paper analysed the spatial relationships between households with a Lassa case and focal locations of potential rodent habitats. Quality and hygiene factors of households were assessed to determine possible risk factors for household rodent infestation and occurrence of Lassa fever.

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