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Material Proximities and Hotspots: Toward an Anthropology of Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers

This resource outlines a research program for an anthropology of viral hemorrhagic fevers and reviews the social science literature on Ebola, Marburg, and Lassa fevers and charts areas for future ethnographic attention. The paper suggests that attention to the material proximities between animals, humans, and objects, that constitute the "hotspot", opens a frontier for critical and methodological development in medical anthropology and for future collaborations in viral hemorrhagic fever management and control.

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Lassa fever is unheralded problem in West Africa

This resource describes primary and secondary transmission of Lassa fever and barrier nursing techniques as a means to prevent this.

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Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC): Viral haemorrhagic fever factsheet

This factsheet provides information on viral haemorrhagic fevers from the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control.

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Lassa fever in West Africa: Evidence for an expanded region of endemicity

This resource presents evidence for an expanded endemicity zone between the two known Lassa endemic regions indicating that Lassa virus is more widely distributed throughout the Tropical Wooded Savanna ecozone in West Africa.

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World Health Organisation (WHO): Lassa fever

This is the WHO emergencies website page for Lassa fever.

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Lassa Fever: a rodent-human interaction

This resource examines the sites of interactions between humans and the multimammate mouse, Mastomys natalensis. It presents findings such as new arenaviruses in other African rodents and in snakes, that  argue preferably toward the host-switching concept. The recent emergence in Sierra Leone, the absence of virus positive Mastomys between the two endemic zones and poor virus diversity in the Mano River area also point in the direction of a unique import of Lassa virus from Nigeria to Sierra Leone during the 19th century. This resource also discusses the hypothesis of human displacements through the Atlantic slave trade and its abolition in 1807.

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Diversity and dynamics in a community of small mammals in coastal Guinea, West Africa

This resource investigated three villages in high endemic zones of Lassa fever in Guinea and presents the biodeiversity of the small mammal community identified through standardized trapping in houses, cultivations and forest.

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Forecasting rodent outbreaks in Africa: an ecological basis for Mastomys control in Tanzania

This study collected rainfall data preceding historical outbreaks of Mastomys rats in East Africa in order to test the hypothesis that such outbreaks occur after long dry periods. It found that rodent outbreaks were generally not preceded by long dry period and the population dynamics of Mastomys natalensis rats in Tanzania are significantly affected by the distribution of rainfall during the rainy season.

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Epidemic preparedness and management: A guide on Lassa fever outbreak preparedness plan

This resource discusses the principles of epidemic management using an emergency operating center model, reviews the epidemiology of Lassa fever in Nigeria, and provides guidance on what is expected to be done in preparing for an epidemic of the disease at health facilities and local and state government levels in line with the Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response strategy.

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Knowledge and application of infectious diseases control measures among primary care workers in Nigeria: The Lassa fever example

This resource investigates the knowledge and practice of Lassa fever control among primary care health workers. The study was a cross-sectional survey of health workers in 34 primary care centres in Esan West and Esan Central Local Government Areas.

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