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Ebola hemorrhagic fever outbreaks in Gabon 1994-1997

This resource describes the fall 1994 epidemic in Gabon and a retrospective check for other etiologic agents due atypical aspects of Yellow fever infection during the epidemic. The paper then highlights the beneficial use of barrier nursing techniques in limiting disease spread and in the prevention of future Ebola hemorrhagic fever epidemics.

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Lassa fever. Epidemiological aspects of the 1970 epidemic

This resource describes the contact tracing of patients during a hospital centred outbreak of Lassa fever in early 1970 in Jos, Nigeria. 

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Sierra Leone continues to struggle for relief from Lassa fever

This short article in The Lancet describes the issues faced by the medical relief charity MERLIN, which provides Lassa fever services in Sierra Leone, during and after the civil war. 

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Mystery virus from Lassa

Two sisters, both with a deep and abiding religious faith, tell the story of their involvement with a severe but unknown viral disease. One is a missionary nurse. Lily, who caught the disease; the other is Rose, who cared for her when she was brought back to the States. The shared story began with a letter from Lily.

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Understanding the cryptic nature of Lassa fever in West Africa

This resource synthesizes current knowledge of Lassa fever (LF) recoligy, epidemiology and distribution to show that extrapolations from past research have produced an incomplete picture of the incidence and distribution of LF, with negative consequences for policy planning, medical treatment and management interventions.

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Lassa fever in post-conflict Sierra Leone

This resource presents observations of case fatality rates of Lassa fever in Sierra Leone after the civil war and compared to studies completed prior to the conflict. Peak presentation of Lassa fever cases occurs in the dry season, which is consistent with previous studies. This paper's studies also confirmed reports conducted prior to the civil war that indicate that infants, children, young adults, and pregnant women are disproportionately impacted by Lassa fever.

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Epidemics of Ebola haemorrhagic fever in Gabon (1994-2002)

This resource considers the cultural and psycho-sociological aspects accounting for the difficulty to implement control measures during the Ebola haemorrhagic fever epidemics in Gabon between 1994 and 2002. It discusses the possibilities of better surveillance and a quick management of intervention means, including a regional permanent pre-alert.

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Epidemic preparedness and management: A guide on Lassa fever outbreak preparedness plan

This resource discusses the principles of epidemic management using an emergency operating center model, reviews the epidemiology of Lassa fever in Nigeria, and provides guidance on what is expected to be done in preparing for an epidemic of the disease at health facilities and local and state government levels in line with the Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response strategy.

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Knowledge and application of infectious diseases control measures among primary care workers in Nigeria: The Lassa fever example

This resource investigates the knowledge and practice of Lassa fever control among primary care health workers. The study was a cross-sectional survey of health workers in 34 primary care centres in Esan West and Esan Central Local Government Areas.

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Epidemics and related cultural factors for Ebola hemorrhagic fever in Gabon

This resource collected information about Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) epidemics from the Gabon Ministry of Health, district hospitals and other facilities and conducted in-depth interviews with 20 villagers and 2 traditional healers in the village where the third epidemic occurred. This study suggests that cultural factors might be very crucial to EHF outbreaks in developing countries. Quick intervention with health education is needed to disseminate appropriate knowledge and persuade people that traditional practices could carry a high risk of infection

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