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Material Proximities and Hotspots: Toward an Anthropology of Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers

This resource outlines a research program for an anthropology of viral hemorrhagic fevers and reviews the social science literature on Ebola, Marburg, and Lassa fevers and charts areas for future ethnographic attention. The paper suggests that attention to the material proximities between animals, humans, and objects, that constitute the "hotspot", opens a frontier for critical and methodological development in medical anthropology and for future collaborations in viral hemorrhagic fever management and control.

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Lassa fever is unheralded problem in West Africa

This resource describes primary and secondary transmission of Lassa fever and barrier nursing techniques as a means to prevent this.

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Understanding the cryptic nature of Lassa fever in West Africa

This resource synthesizes current knowledge of Lassa fever (LF) recoligy, epidemiology and distribution to show that extrapolations from past research have produced an incomplete picture of the incidence and distribution of LF, with negative consequences for policy planning, medical treatment and management interventions.

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Lassa fever in West Africa: Evidence for an expanded region of endemicity

This resource presents evidence for an expanded endemicity zone between the two known Lassa endemic regions indicating that Lassa virus is more widely distributed throughout the Tropical Wooded Savanna ecozone in West Africa.

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World Health Organisation (WHO): Lassa fever

This is the WHO emergencies website page for Lassa fever.

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Lassa fever: The politics of an emerging disease and the scope for One Health

As a rodent borne virus, Lassa fever is of particular interest from a One Health perspective. The interplay between security, public health and One Health approaches are explored through ethnographic and interview based research in Kenema, Sierra Leone, a long-term treatment and research hub. ‘Biodefence dollars’ have provided the majority of recent funding in Sierra Leone and have created opportunities for both local and international actors to address a neglected disease.

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Understanding the cryptic nature of Lassa fever in West Africa

In this article the authors give an overview of the current knowledge on Lassa fever (ecology, epidemiology and distribution) and the importance of future socio-ecological changes in the increase of Lassa fever burden.

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Using modelling to disentangle the relative contributions of zoonotic and anthroponotic transmission: The case of Lassa fever

The authors present the results of a modelling approach, using published data from outbreak and patients to Kenema governmental Hospital in Sierra Leone. They estimate the likely contribution to human to human transmission. They shed light on the need to better assess the human to human transmission.

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Shadowlands and dark corners: An anthropology of light and zoonosis

This paper outlines the importance of the house construction and the light for the human and rodent interactions in Upper Guinea (Guinea). To address this interspecies entanglements it is necessary to have in mind how darkness created by furniture and the house design can expand the activity of the animal and the persistence of virus in surfaces. It also highlights the difficulty to localize the trapping of small rodents by kids.

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Challenges in preparing and implementing a clinical trial at field level in an Ebola emergency: A case study in Guinea, West Africa

This resource describes the main challenges of the implementation of a trial in the Ebola treatment center of Guéckédou. Following the principles of the Good Clinical Research Practices, it reports the aspects of the community’s communication and engagement, ethical conduct, trial protocol compliance, informed consent of participants, ongoing benefit/risk assessment, record keeping, confidentiality of patients and study data, and roles and responsibilities of the actors involved.

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