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Epidemic preparedness and management: A guide on Lassa fever outbreak preparedness plan

This resource discusses the principles of epidemic management using an emergency operating center model, reviews the epidemiology of Lassa fever in Nigeria, and provides guidance on what is expected to be done in preparing for an epidemic of the disease at health facilities and local and state government levels in line with the Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response strategy.

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Knowledge and application of infectious diseases control measures among primary care workers in Nigeria: The Lassa fever example

This resource investigates the knowledge and practice of Lassa fever control among primary care health workers. The study was a cross-sectional survey of health workers in 34 primary care centres in Esan West and Esan Central Local Government Areas.

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Review of cases of nosocomial Lassa fever in Nigeria: The high price of poor medical practice

This resource reviewed medical records in hospitals and clinics in rural and urban areas of Imo State, Nigeria, and reports on its investigation into two hospital outbreaks. In this study, patients with presumed and laboratory confirmed Lassa fever were identified and contracts traced. Hospital staff, patients, and local residents were questioned, records were carefully reviewed, and serum samples were taken. Serum samples were assayed for antibody specific to Lassa virus, and isolates of Lassa virus were obtained.

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Lassa Virus Hemorrhagic Fever in Benin in 2014 in an Ebola Context: An Epidemic Revealing the Weakness of the Health System

This resource aims to understand the social conditions of the outbreak and evolution of the Lassa haemorrhagic fever epidemic in Benin, 2014, and the technical, political and institutional processes of its management by the state and international alert network and health response. It reports on the results of a qualitative survey conducted at several sites: at the Ministry of Health in Cotonou, in the health services (including the Saint-Jean de Dieu Hospital in Tanguiéta in the north of the country), and in the families of the geographical area of ​​the epidemic.

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Knowledge, attitude and practice of Lassa fever prevention by students of the University of Benin

This study assessed the knowledge, attitude and practice of prevention of Lassa fever, amongst students resident in the campuses of University of Benin. The knowledge of the majority 276 (91.7%) of the study population about Lassa fever disease was poor. Good preventive practices were reported by 28 (73.3%) of respondents and fair practices was reported by 10 (24.3%) of respondents with good knowledge.  It was found that preventive practices were significantly associated with level of study of students (p=0.033). Conclusion: Continued dissemination of accurate information on Lassa fever disease is indicated at all levels of study in the University system to improve preventive practices and reduce risk of Lassa fever disease amongst student population.

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Monkeypox: Did the Nigerian media do more harm than good?

The objective of this study was to describe the kind of information published by the media during the Monkeypox outbreak in Nigeria. Although most of the information reported were from verifiable sources, there was a high level of sensationalism around the Monkeypox outbreak which heightened public anxiety. Health reporters and the media in Nigeria should be trained on how to accurately report disease outbreak reports and health facts.

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Knowledge, attitude and practice to Lassa fever virus among shop owners in four community markets in a military barrack in Kaduna state, Nigeria

This resource describes the results of a Knowledge, attitude and practice survey conducted amongst shop owners of four community markets in a military barrack in Kaduna state, Nigeria. The findings in this study show that the respondents have a good knowledge, and positive attitudes and practices towards Lassa fever virus. Nonetheless, awareness programs should continue, proper medical care should be provided for the sick, and protective gears should be available to health care workers.

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Awareness of Lassa fever in a rural community in South West Nigeria

The study showed that there was poor awareness of Lassa fever among members of the community. Thus efforts should be made to increase the awareness of the populace through health campaigns, and to reduce the spread of both the vector and the virus.

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Public awareness of Lassa fever in three rural communities of Nigeria

This resource aims to assess public awareness of Lassa fever among residents of three rural communities in Edo State, Nigeria through the use of a structured questionnaire. The television was the most popular source of Lassa fever awareness in all communities studied. Among participants who reported to have heard of Lassa fever, vehicles of transmission of disease mentioned included mosquito bites 9 (32.1%), dog bites 7 (25%) and eating of rat-contaminated food 2 (7.1%). Sleeping under mosquito bed nets and intake of herbal concoction were the principal mode of prevention of Lassa fever reported by respondents.

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Lassa fever outbreak in Southwestern Nigeria: The Ekiti state response amidst economic recession

This article describes part of the response to an outbreak of Lassa fever in Nigeria in 2016.  The paper underlines the importance of Intersectoral collaboration and political will in response to outbreaks at the provincial or state, but also records challenges to control efforts including inadequate local laboratory capacity and fear among health workers, panic response among the general populace as well as deficient emergency preparedness.

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